Category: Rock

David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr) download full album zip cd mp3 vinyl flac

Published 22.09.2019


Download David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr)

Label: The Dance Division - PROTMC 153401 • Format: CDr Promo • Country: Sweden • Genre: Electronic • Style: House, Tribal House

I also valued his footnotes: in fact, I think I garnered more valuable information from those than I did from the book, as a whole. If you're looking for a good overview of Homer, I wouldn't pass this one by.

It might even give an interesting perspective to the uninitiated. Just don't be looking for an answer to the title's promise: Nicolson can't really tell you more than you already know, if you've read Homer yourself.

View all 6 comments. And why not? Classics are timeless. Even if this is about a classic as opposed to a classic itself. Adam Nicolson covers all the bases and then some in this perspective on why Homer is perm-cool and forever relevant. He covers a lot of ground and wine-dark seaincluding key scenes in both The Odyssey and The Iliad. He makes some connections and takes some stands that will shake Homerphiles up a bit.

For starters, how about Greek heroes as hooligans? I most enjoyed his chapter comparing the invaders to modern-day gangs. By this theory, Troy represents civilization: wealth, stability, marriage, order, amenities, respect, sedentary pursuits, et, cetera.

By contrast the roman sic Greeks are the nomadic bad boys. They wear their wealth not so much on their cities and palaces as on their gleaming bodies and bloodied war toys. They see the wealth and feel a mixture of envy and disgust. They feel slights over the slightest things. When they are disrespected, they gain respect from each other by brutally attacking the source of the dis. That's a Greek hero redefined. And oddly, the butcher Achilles earns respect by dissing Agamemnon, King O' the Greeks, who offers all kinds of "goods" to ask for forgiveness for stealing Achilles' girl toy.

Of course that's nothing compared to Achilles after the Trojans dispatch his boy toy. All very interesting stuff. Nicolson also travels the wine-darks himself. Not only that, but visits sites visited by the other wily butcher, Odysseus think of big O's last big scene with the suitors And though Homer glorifies battle, he is no fan of Death's. Never mind the irony. All in all, just the sort of book you should read before diving into one of H's epic doorstops.

Me, I purchased the Fagles Odyssey. It's waiting at summer's port. I just have to get there. Calypso, you see View all 9 comments. Dec 17, James Murphy rated it it was amazing. This is one of the most useful complements to a reading of Homer I know of. Adam Nicolson's knowledge of Homer's great works and his understanding of the Homeric world seem truly deep.

Along with the important literary analysis The Mighty Dead is dense with historial fact and perspecctive concerning Bronze Age conflict, the tribal nature of Greek socity compared to the more civilized Trojans, Greek origins, and the importance of Troy to the ancient world. Nicolson has some interesting ideas: he This is one of the most useful complements to a reading of Homer I know of.

Nicolson has some interesting ideas: he convincingly equates the warrior attitudes of Greeks on the beach at Troy with the gang ethos present in modern East St. Louis, and he writes a section late in the book explaining how the Biblical Philistines were the same kinds of Mycanean warriors who besieged Troy.

The book bubbles from front cover to back with such energetic insight ranging from who Homer really was to why we stilll refer to him for news of the past and why he so accurately reflects the nature of modern man. As equally delightful as Nicolson's knowledge of Homer and the world of the Greeks is how well the book is written. Nicolson is a wonderfully descriptive writer. One personal reflection of how he himself once had a knife held to his throat illuminates the fighting on the beach at Troy.

Another--and these are just 2 examples--is a description of a stormy sea, something he as sailor knows as well as the Greeks did. His elegant image of the way a gull can raise one wing to expose his chest to the wind as a way of lifting himself higher took my breath away.

The book is full of such moments. You don't necessarily have to read Nicolson to read and apporeciate Homer. Homer can stand on his own 2 feet. But you'll want to read Nicolson for the depth of background he can give you about Homer's famous poems. And for the joy of Nicolson's writing. I want to read The Iliad again The author expresses himself quite well. Homer is here; Homer is now. He can be seen in the olive groves, in archeological digs, in gang mentality.

I appreciated the use of appropriate Greek words and their etymological roots. I'm inspired to learn Ancient Greek now.

Lenten Buddy Reading Challenge book View 2 comments. Nicolson is provocative in numerous ways, from the origins of the Homeric epics which he pulls back to the origins of indo-european civilization, to the inspiration of Keat's poem on Chapman's translation a poem that is critical of the Alexander Pope translation. In short, he doesn't believe there was a Homer, but sees Homer as a collection of myth accumulated and standardized over time with origins around bce.

To understand Homer he goes in many different directions, collecting a variety Nicolson is provocative in numerous ways, from the origins of the Homeric epics which he pulls back to the origins of indo-european civilization, to the inspiration of Keat's poem on Chapman's translation a poem that is critical of the Alexander Pope translation.

To understand Homer he goes in many different directions, collecting a variety of research into a pretty readable form. I loved his section on Keats. His sections on mining and Hades, and on the Hittite, Egyptian and Israelite views on a Greeks were really interesting. He puts a new light, for me, on David vs Goliath.

His comparison of East St. Louis gangs to the Greek army in the Iliad was fascinating. He also includes his own sea faring experience, and bravely, the story of his own rape. I thought it was interesting how he essentially disregards all modern archaeological research into Troy with the common sense comment that bce is a baseless date.

Troy II, from a years earlier is not only just as valid, by maybe more valid because the Greeks were more raw and barbarous and Troy was wealthier at that time and less Greek.

Anyway, this isn't history, it's myth. He's not perfect. And sometimes seems to think himself more a wordsmith then he really is. But, still, in summary, David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr), for the Homer curious, recommended. This should be a required companion volume either before or during reading The Odyssey and Iliad. I understood so much more about the cultures of both the Greeks and the Trojans and their histories after reading it.

He takes you to the places where much of the action occurred and where they speculate that the Greeks originated. He also explores the history of Homer and the theories about him. All of this is done in an incredibly readable fashion. All I can say is that must've been a stonking year if this book didn't even make the shortlist!

I've seldom read a book that spreads itself so magisterially and readably over literary criticism, ancient history, linguistics, morality, poetry, psychology, sociology, and geography. It's in many ways a genre-busting book, containing autobiographical elements alongside insights into Homer, the world of the Ancient Greeks fr 'Longlisted for the Samuel Johnson prize,' it says on the cover.

It's in many ways a genre-busting book, containing autobiographical elements alongside insights into Homer, the world of the Ancient Greeks from the Steppe migrations right up to Chicago gang culture.

Nothing seems out of place or forced into the narrative. Nicolson wears his learning as lightly as one of Helen's chiffon garments; the gold of his insights as delicately veneer-thin as a golden body image from a Mycenaean tomb.

If this didn't win in One poet's love affair with Homer. Each chapter's different perspective-- chiefly on the Iliad, but the Odyssey gets a look-in too-- is enchantingly written and genuinely insightful.

Not the scholarly consensus on dating by a long chalk, but powerfully argued. There was some interesting materials in here about Homeric traditions and what you currently in the places that are supposed to the locations of the legends, but the good stuff was drowned out by drone an author who seemed to be in love with the sound of his own voice.

I initially chose this book for obvious reasons--but The Iliad and The Odyssey are two of my favorite works in all their David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr) translations, so it was great to spend some quality time with a writer who's an enthusiastic amateur rather than a Homeric scholar per se.

Lots of great travelogue stuff in here too, which alwa I initially chose this book for obvious reasons--but The Iliad and The Odyssey are two of my favorite works in all their many translations, so it was great to spend some quality time with a writer who's an enthusiastic amateur rather than a Homeric scholar per se. Lots of great travelogue stuff in here too, which always goes down well at least for me in the summer. That Adam Nicolson is an excellent journalist I already knew but as a non fiction novelist he is a revelation.

Don't be put off by the seemingly high brow subject matter. He makes Homer accessible and describes just why it is so important to western civilisation especially in these rudderless times.

Its a travelogue through the classical world recreated in the present day, throwing up all manner of nuggets on all sorts of topics as we wind our way through the Mediterranean, up to the Hebrides an That Adam Nicolson is an excellent journalist I already knew but as a non fiction novelist he is a revelation.

Its a travelogue through the classical world recreated in the present day, throwing up all manner of nuggets on all sorts of topics as we wind our way through the Mediterranean, up to the Hebrides and back to Hades in modern Portugal. We visit the shores of the Black Sea and the European Steppe heartland and maybe find the Western soul there hidden in plain sight.

Who would have thought? There is darkness too, deep melancholy, apt for a book on Homer. Adam's experiences in Syria are harrowing and disturbing to read. But this chapter explains the banality of evil better than any number of holocaust novels. He writes such beautiful touching prose on a subject he loves. He wants the reader to share his love too. I would read him on anything after this book. A year ago, I picked up Fagles translation of the Iliad, more from a dutiful sense that I should reconnect with the classics I read many years ago than in expectation of pleasure.

Then came an intense, David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr) but utterly engrossing and compelling reading experience. This book is written for people like me, but it is such a superlative, masterful piece of writing th A year ago, I picked up Fagles translation of the Iliad, more from a dutiful sense that I should reconnect with the classics I read many years ago than in expectation of pleasure.

This book is written for people like me, but it is such a superlative, masterful piece of writing that I hope many more people read it, and come to Homer that way. Or perhaps you should read Homer so that you can enjoy The Mighty Dead! Nicolson undertakes to explain and explore how a pair of poems that seemingly celebrate brutality, pride and deceit can be so aesthetically powerful: what is the version of reality they explore and display?

His answer is personal, poetic, scholarly and literary. I found myself thinking, this is what all literary criticism should be: a charged personal engagement with a text. The scholarship which in this work is considerable though I am unable to vouch for its strength is there to serve that encounter and make it available to others. Nicolson merges the Parry view of Homer as the final inheritor of a tradition of epic recitation and improvisation with the finding that sometimes ancient tales are transmitted unblemished over many generations.

This is a little evasive, but it helps him locate Homer in the very distant past, far beyond the 8th century favoured by some scholars; and the events he describes in a more distant past than the C13th setting assumed by most in the field. His Trojan War occurred around the turn of the millennium, BC, or perhaps a couple of century later. His Greeks are neo-Barbarians, gangsters and pirates, carrying with them memories of the Steppes and the Indo-Aryan past; while the Trojans represent an already ancient Near-Eastern civilisation with its associated virtues: settlement, civility, domesticity.

This I find powerfully clarifying. This isn't then a civil war between two camps in a broad Greek civilisation, but a clash of cultures. Achilles versus Hector is killing machine versus the defender of his homeland: two very different ideas of heroism. This Homer sees through the eyes of the Greeks, but he allows their flaws to be exposed in the Trojan relief; and Homer's depth springs, for Nicolson, from this perspectival stance. Whether or not you love Homer, and whether or not you agree with his interpretation, this book may be read for the masterful quality of its prose.

Every sentence and paragraph moulds diverse materials into wonderfully supple, constantly vivid writing. At times, as in the passages of personal description, this has the grip of imaginative literature; but even the expository prose is of a very high quality indeed.

That's only possible when a writer knows a subject from within and has the expressive power that allows him to range freely over it. God, I wish I could write like Nicolson! This may just be one of the best lay-person's explorations of classical literature and epic poetry I have ever had the pleasure to read. Nicolson has a poet's grasp of image and language and a critic's sense of literary significance and resonance.

This book is not only an excellent introduction to Homeric epic, but it serves as a reminder of why continuing emphasis on the humanities and interdisciplinary study is crucial in understanding the world around us and our place in it.

Nicolson's musing This may just be one of the best lay-person's explorations of classical literature and epic poetry I have ever had the pleasure to read. Nicolson's musings range from oral formulaic style and works-in-translation, to the significance of metallurgy in cultural development, to the continuing resonance of martial symbolism in graphic art, to a meditation on how human beings face death in a transient world.

Throughout, he weaves in his own personal discovery of Homer's significance with a recounting of life experiences both tragic and humorous, intimate and profound. If you have never cracked a copy of the Iliad, begin here. And If you have personally memorized thousands of lines of Greek dactylic hexameter, this book will deepen your appreciation of Homer's epic tradition and its relevance to our modern world. Highly recommended.

I've now read this book twice Wasn't expecting to me so moved by this story but I should have not been surprised. Just one quote. Worth buying, reading, keeping and re-reading. Made me eager to order a couple of the newer translations Nicholson quoted from and read the Iliad and the Odyssey again.

In Why Homer Matters, Adam Nicholson explores the reasons why Homer, well over two thousand years after his poems were composed, still offers unique and precious gifts to modern readers, and also, on a personal level, he describes how reading Homer has enriched his own life.

Nicholson moves between sections describing his experiences with Homer — times and places w Wonderful. Nicholson moves between sections describing his experiences with Homer — times and places where the some part of the poems has seemed to capture some essential truth — and sections describing the history of the poems, the peoples involved, and Homeric scholarship.

He describes major shifts in how the poems have been believed to be composed, particularly in the early 20th century, largely through the work of Milman Parry. Nicholson believes that the poems' origins extend farther back than is typically proposed.

He does a wonderful job describing the clues from the poems which might date elements of the stories to a period before BC. He even presents an interesting argument for the idea that the warriors Heinrich Schliemann found in Mycenaean shaft graves were, in fact, as he claimed, Homer's Greek kings.

Having traced Homeric elements back to 16th century Mycenae, Nicholson then follows the story even farther back, going north and west, into Europe and Asia, and south and east, towards Egypt and Mesopotamia. Plenty of what he suggests is speculative, sometimes highly so, but he is quite up front about this, and the evidence he presents is intriguing for example, the importance of horses in Homer as evidence of a background Indo-European steppe heritage.

Nicholson is a good writer, and he explores a subject where non-scholarly readers might easily get bogged down he does a lovely job explaining Homeric hexameters, and also uses the example of the bedtime story-poems he composed for his children to illustrate the idea of formulaic compositionin a very readable, entertaining style.

While recognizing that in many ways Homer's stories are utterly foreign and impossibly distant from us, Nicolson shows how, more essentially, the poems remain relevant and true to life, offering insights and clarity to readers today. While it was lovely to get the book for free, this did not affect my review. I imagine every student with a Homer writing assignment will now simply choose a chapter from this book and have their research done.

The most up-to-date comprehensive compendium of research related to The Illiad and The Odyssey. My only disappointment is the title. The title question is addressed on the last page, and this felt to me like an after thought. As Greek history through Homer, the book is a great read. I won a copy of this book in a Goodreads First Reads giveaway on September 20, I received my copy on September 30, It was the book I had been waiting for. Perfectly relates Homer to our world. View 1 comment. This had lots of fascinating information, but the style wasn't really what I was looking for; I'd have preferred more academic rigor and less musing about the author's own life.

I decided to pick this up after reading Circe and tackling Elizabeth Wilson's new translation of the Odyssey, which was published after this book was written.

Nicolson is a man obsessed with Homer. His descriptions are filled with over-the-top extremes and occasional contradictions, but they are enthralling. It was fun to ride his coattails through the ancient world. Eventually it became clear he had I decided to pick this up after reading Circe and tackling Elizabeth Wilson's new translation of the Odyssey, which was published after this book was written.

Eventually it became clear he had deeply personal reasons for being drawn to Homer, and I liked the lessons he took away. But those are not the lessons I gleaned from my own reading - the violence and unrelenting masculinity overwhelmed all else for me.

Maybe it's time for a new epic to arise, one that speaks to women as well as men and offers a different set of possibilities.

Just finished this book. I recommend it highly. It may inspire you to revisit or visit for the first time these epic poems which, with their beautiful rawness and vitality, can still speak to us of the human condition and fate in a way that remains relevant today.

This book inspires me to bring my own experiences, struggles and pain, and Just finished this book. In fact, at a glance, the cue is almost identical to Rose Creek Oppression.

Volcano Springs, Part 1 The cue begins with a melody that seems to be connected with Faraday, one of the most memorable of the Seven, heard again at Faraday has run into some old enemies, who try to force him into a mine, where they are certain to kill him. Soon, the string pattern from The 33 reappears. And although its inclusion here is initially puzzling, it is appropriate, and will lead to a satisfying pay-off later. Volcano Springs, Part 2 In this picturesque scene comes David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr) most overt use of any Bernstein material.

The trombones blare out a single note incessantly, evenly, forming a foundation over which a melody is played — the same technique Bernstein used for one of his themes. It then transitions into the Rose Creek theme, first victorious and hopeful. Then it moves into a sweet, major-key melody, seemingly a variation of the revenge theme. In the film, this cue is truncated, beginning at approximately As the group parts ways, the Bernstein rhythm dances alongside the wild west motif.

And then, of course, a trumpet sings four simple notes. How bittersweet to hear the danger motif again. And it is as menacing and thrilling as ever.

This cue actually appears in the film three different times. It functions well in every instance, but this seems to be the scene it was written for. Volcano Springs, Part 3 The final third of this track is heard as Faraday and Teddy ride into Volcano Springs.

Here, Goodnight Robicheaux will be enlisted, along with Billy Rocks. The Bernstein rhythm is heard in ethnic flutes and hand claps, under a gallant, if a little bit awkward, melody. Fierce hand claps preface a melody that will appear again, played by horn. A crescendo of strings playing the Rose Creek theme sets the stage for its full appearance. Meet Jack Horne, the next warrior to be recruited. Instead of being dropped into the usual duple meter, the wild west motif seems to have its way here, not allowing us to easily identify any specific time signature.

The revenge theme appears on subtle strings. Although it is often connected with death, it is actually used to signify the parting of ways between characters, more specifically a moment in which a character must let go of — or say goodbye to — a loved one, forever.

The male vocal from Street Slaughter returns, joined by Native American flavored chant, as the team pitches camp for the night. In one of the more serene moments of the score, a gentle piano and soothing ethnic flute provide a reflective atmosphere for the conversation between Chisholm and Goodnight.

Next, Red Harvest appears, and after a discussion with Chisholm, feels that he could have a place among this group. Part of this cue is unreleased. Then, Lighting the Fuse is repeated, underscoring a brief riding montage. The Seven now assembled, we return to Rose Creek. As in Rose Creek Oppressionthe revenge theme blends with the Bernstein rhythm and wild west motif, reminding us that nothing has actually changed yet — the oppression of Rose Creek continues.

It is a pattern that seems to represent patriotism in some form. It here blends seamlessly with the revenge theme, forcing us to wonder: are the characters acting out of a sense of duty to Rose Creek? Or what are they really after? Seven Angels of Vengeance. It opens with a catchy, energetic riff for strings and brass. The wild west figure sneaks into the mix atclearer than before, more of a melody than an ambient sound. Atthe cocky guitar strings of Volcano Springs reappear as Chisholm smoothly reloads his pistol.

Ata lyrical melody joins the mix, giving a sense of nobility to the action. And atwe get our first glimpse of the main theme. It is less about the soaring grandeur of David Sanchez (2) - The Magnificent Desire (CDr), but the hope which lifts the spirit and spurs the characters on to noble deeds.

However, this is a very brief glimpse — it will be fully developed later. Goodnight Robicheaux has yet to fire his rifle. We hear chaotic, echo-ey brass, strongly connected to the wild west motif.

These notes, although distinct from the wild west idea, is also derived from the Battle Beyond the Stars motif. But in this moment, instead of highlighting the violence of the west, perhaps it draws a connection with a specific character.

In the space flick, the young hero Shad must defend his people from invaders, in spite of his pacifistic creed. The town gathers to meet the Seven, but are less than grateful.

Many of them have no intention of fighting. The wild west identity is a chilling reminder of the horrors that war will bring, and the Rose Creek theme sounds hesitant, unsure of itself. Town Exodus — Knife Training. Indeed, a large portion of the town decides to leave before the conflict starts.

The Rose Creek theme is both melancholy and positive. He publicly challenges him, leaving Goodnight no choice. The strange, brassy sounds from the conclusion of Seven Angels return as Goodnight proves himself and Faraday is, for now, satisfied.

The main theme is presented again, still not complete, but more present than ever before. Things are really beginning to come together. As they ride past a waving American flag, we hear the patriotic snare drums, and the miners are invited to join them in their cause. As the liberated men troop into town, we hear once more the theme from The 33and the connection is finally made clear: miners!

Together with the Bernstein rhythm, the music portends the terrible battle to come. The wild west motif accompanies the preparations. As Chisholm looks out from the church doorframe, over the town that he will save, we hear the main theme. Atthe wild west pattern appears in strengthened form — danger is approaching. Atthe Rose Creek theme shows its aggressive side, with strong brass and percussion. As the townspeople celebrate their achievements inside the saloon, Chisholm reflectively looks out from a balcony.

The preacher thanks him for their newfound hope, but Chisholm reminds him that everyone may die. Hints of the revenge theme hang over them like a cloud. The Rose Creek theme is heard in a similar arrangement as in the Opening Titles cue. Suddenly, Red Harvest races in on his horse, with news that the army approaches — the wild west motif and Bernstein rhythm blend with a scratchy-sounding flute. Cut to the army, riding quickly toward Rose Creek. In an unreleased portion of the cue, a choir sings a single, swelling, intense chord.

Goodnight Robicheaux is not all that he seems to be. Before he can sneak away, Chisholm approaches him. The trumpets play a war-like melody, the same melody we heard in Volcano Springswhere we first met Goodnight. The patriotic snare drums tell us of the history these characters have together. But Goodnight has seen enough killing, and Sam cannot make him stay. Atand especially afterslippery, high-pitched, electric-sounding squeals hail to The Chumscrubber and Southpaw.

All struggle with intense inner turmoil, are surrounded by a hostile world from which they cannot escape, and are plagued by intense guilt. This cue is serene, thoughtful, one of the last tender moments before the final battle. There is intense percussion, building up to the explosion that marks the start of the fighting. A minor version of the Rose Creek theme atand again atin a subdued form. Even so, the sequence does mostly follow Faraday.

It opens with the same material as Seven Angels of Vengeancebut with a harsher, deeper texture. Then the cue resumes with the Magnificent Seven theme, somewhat condensed, as the heroes continue their battle. The Darkest Hour was originally written as one long cue, total. The choice to shorten it on the album was most likely made in favor of releasing other material, even though the full cue is an incredible composition, and yet another highlight of the score.

It seems to begin in triple meter, and the wild west motif, here in triplet form, finally has its way, fitting comfortably in each measure. Atit is performed gloriously.

The wild west motif enters along with Bogue, who encounters Chisholm. The percussive sounds of the revenge theme join the Bernstein rhythm. As they have a stand-off, the revenge identity becomes stronger, and the patriotism snare drums enter the scene, again begging the question: what is Chisholm fighting for?


Sitemap

Island In The Sun - The Paragons - On The Beach (Vinyl, LP, Album), Adamis (2) - The Funky Music (Vinyl), Writing On The Wall - [re:jazz] - Point Of View (Vinyl, LP), Pet Eunuch - Clinic - Walking With Thee (CD, Album), Swing The Big Eyed Rabbit - The Cramps - Flame Job (CD, Album), Missin U (Miss Cherokee Ol Skool Remix) - Siani - Missin U (CD), Uptown - The Crystals - Twist Uptown (Vinyl, LP, Album), The Power - Cher - Believe (Cassette, Album), Missin U (Linslee Remix) - Siani - Missin U (CD), Instrumental - Humanity Stall - Humanity Stall (CD), In Indulgence - Hellchild - Bareskin (CD, Album), Serenade In G Major, K. 525, «Eine Kleine Nachtmusik» - Various - A Treasury Of Concert Favourites (, Price-Sulton - No T.V. No Phone (Vinyl)

Published in Rock

8 Comments

  1. Nitaur   Vule
    Miami Boulevard (Day) - David Sánchez. 3. The Magnificent Desire - David Sánchez. More by David Sánchez. Carib. Ninety Miles Live At Cubadisco. Ninety Miles. Cultural Survival. Travesía. More David Sánchez. Listen to Miami Boulevard now. Listen to .
    27.09.2019 Reply
  2. Shaktitaxe   Fenribar
    Jazz Sax / David Sanchez - Los Aretes De La Luna - Obsesion 01 by 7teacup. The Magnificent Desire by David Sanchez - Topic. River Tales by David Sánchez - Topic.
    26.09.2019 Reply
  3. Najora   Jujinn
    Sep 19,  · The Magnificent Desire By David Sánchez. • 1 song, Play on Spotify. 1. The Magnificent Desire. Featured on Miami boulevard. More by David Sánchez. Carta a Mi Padre. Genexis EP. Se Hizo De Noche EP. Feel (Tech) Canto. More David Sánchez. Listen to David Music Duration: 4 min.
    30.09.2019 Reply
  4. Gukree   Sazshura
    The Magnificent Desire (Original Mix) bpm, 12A / Db minor, , Tech House, 0 David Sanchez. Level One Records. 6: Preacher Drum (Original Mix) bpm, 3A / Bb minor, , Tech House, 0 Black Nation. Level One Records. 7: Tela Tela (Original Mix).
    01.10.2019 Reply
  5. Shakinos   Goltishakar
    Directed by Cliff Owen. With Eric Morecambe, Ernie Wise, Margit Saad, Virgilio Teixeira. Two salesmen travel to a small South American Country to peddle their wares. However the country is in the middle of a major conflict between the Government led by Diaz and the rebels led by Torres. When Torres is accidentally killed the rebels mistaken pick up one of the salesmen, Eric, as he looks like Missing: David Sanchez.
    02.10.2019 Reply
  6. Fenrilabar   Gronos
    The Best Jazz Albums of Initial draft collected on Nov. 11, The file will be updated as additional worthy records are found (although updating may lag behind the official list).Last year's list was never frozen (OK, let's say it was frozen on Nov. 11, ). There also exists a parallel list of The Best Non-Jazz of Note: numbering of lists (aside from A/A-) is only.
    28.09.2019 Reply
  7. Kazigar   Mooguzil
    Recorded at Power Station, NYC, Feb & 29, March 1, Mixed at Sony Studios, NYC, March 13&14, Mastered at Sony Studio, NYC, April 19 & 23,
    29.09.2019 Reply
  8. Gardagrel   Vonos
    Download Soweto songs, singles and albums on MP3. Over one million legal MP3 tracks available at Juno Download. Soweto.
    26.09.2019 Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *